29 October 2014

America Reads 2014-2015 October Blog Prompt





ATTN: America Reads Tutor


What are the challenges to being an America Reads tutor? What are you doing to overcome these challenges?  Do you have any advice for others for how to make this easier?

54 comments:

  1. The challenges are: You may be the only one to teach a student and the parents may not know what to do and how to do it. So you are the link between the child and parent and possibly teacher. I look at the challenges I am having being a tutor and the challenges of the student being tutored. I decide it is more important for me to know what to do so I can help out the student. For instance in once school I tutored 3-6th graders. Here I do reading, teaching someone to read cursive so they can print their words in the proper column, doing simple math and then up to beginning algebra. I listen to the teacher teaching the children so when she leaves I can be of so much more help to her. These teachers have such a huge responsibility on them and especially after school programs. The children can be rude and she takes care of that. When I arrive she is so grateful that I came and told my husband that I was of such great help to her. She has around 20+ students daily after school to take care of. So as a tutor I am a huge help to her because I can help 7-10 children that she otherwise would not be able to help.
    Take your tutoring seriously and have fun. Just know that the teachers and students enjoy it when you are there. When I went to Whittier Elementary I went to the class room and the teacher said "Who wants to go with her?" all the class raised their hands. It was so nice to see that they all wanted me there.

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    1. Boo,
      It has been my experience that teachers really need all the TA's and volunteers they can get to fill in the gaps for those who need one on one help. I agree that tutoring (paid or not) is very important. We are an extension of the teacher and can make all the difference in a student's success!
      CLS

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    2. I also agree that tutoring is very important, whether we are paid or not. Because in my experience with this program so far, is that the kids need our extra help because their teachers can't do one on one with them, and we don't know what their lifestyle is at home. We can benefit these kids' life's and helping them for the better. If anything there is a hidden blessing behind it all, especially when we can see the kids improving over time.

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  2. Replies
    1. It is true that we as tutors may be the only ones able to get through to students. As well as be a voice for them so that they are able to their voices heard, because sometimes they are over looked.

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    2. ^^Sorry that reply was from: H.P.^^

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  3. I think the biggest challenge is balance of time, helping the children, being attentive, and understanding how to best help each child.
    I think tutoring is a great way to discover if teaching is for you! Don't give up on the children, even if you think they don't ":get it". They all deserve to be happy, educated and feel important!

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    1. I agree with you that tutoring is a good way of discovering if someone would work out in the teaching field. I was in that position, and even though I love tutoring, I can't see myself being a teacher.
      H.P.

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    2. Momsrbz2,
      Yes, balance is hard to perfect. I tend to focus on rotational emphasis of time/learning/effectiveness. What i mean by this is that there are days that the goal is to get through the lesson to see how the student does and make notes on levels of priority for later. Then there are days to slow down and take more time on getting a specific concept (no matter how far we get). Any efforts i can put into helping a child are beneficial in some way, so giving up is not an option :).

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    3. Oops! The above reply is from CLS.

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    4. I've been there at times before where I feel like kids aren't completely understanding what I'm teaching them. I start to doubt myself and get discouraged. You were right to point out that so many of these times they really are getting things out of the tutor session and it's important to never give up on a student or a tutoring session. Brian H.

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    5. I agree with H.P. I just recently changed my major to Early Childhood Education. I chose this because of my tutoring experiences. I love working with the students but I don't see myself becoming a teacher. I am leaning more toward Preschool assistant or working with Special Education students. There are a lot of options out there to work with children.

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    6. I agree with you. There are many times where it is easy to just give up, and yet, if we can choose not to give up on the kids that we tutor, no matter what, the feeling afterwards will be incredible. And this job is a good way to see if we can be full time teachers or if we just want to stick to tutoring. The hidden blessings are the same.

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  4. One of my main challenges that I have faced being an America Reads tutor has been the babysitter for my own kids, so that I am able to come tutor. I now have worked out my babysitting issues. When dealing with challenges in the school setting; I have noticed this year so far has been keeping the students on task and having the get the answers instead of me just giving them the answers. I am keeping the students on task by having them read and reading to them books that interests them. While I am reading to them I have them help me read it by recognizing and saying the words or phrases that they know. A piece of advice I would share with other tutors is do not be afraid to ask for help whether it be from other tutors, coordinators, teachers, or Lynne. All of those choices are great assets that we are able to use.
    H.P.

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    1. HP,
      I agree that it can be a struggle to keep students on task, with all the distractions in an outside of a classroom. I do most of my tutoring in the hallway and have learned to take "breaks" while a class is shuffling out to recess or a child really wants to tell me something before moving on. Picking my battles has helped reduced the stress level, which creates a better environment for the student to learn.
      CLS

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    2. Finding books that interest the student is important. I have them pick from the section of books from which they are currently reading from so that they pick stories that interest them. Good point. Also you are right. Tutors don't always have the answer and may need to consult the coordinator. Don't be afraid to do this. They are more than happy to help. Brian H.

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    3. I don't know how many children you have, but at the YMCA, one of the teachers brings their child to program. My head at the Y asked me why I didn't bring my daughter to work like it was ridiculous to not. It made me laugh, but this might be a valid option for you. They also give the volunteers and employees their extra food they can't use in time before it spoils. My grocery bill has been drastically reduced! And on a side note, don't forget our school has it's very own food pantry. Even if you're not struggling, free food is free! Spend your money on something else.
      I read a book on child rearing, and I found many of their suggestions to be useful in my volunteering. One of them was what you said, which is to get them to answer questions themselves. Another one I liked was giving them options. When you work with them, let them choose small silly things, especially things that won't really matter in the long run, like where to sit. As long as you are sitting somewhere that isn't too distracting, you should be fine and your kid will enjoy working with you more because it's THEIR choice. Especially when they don't want to do what you're asking them to do. It might take a while, but giving them this options will help them feel better.
      Good luck,
      Jeslicania

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  5. My main challenge in getting started as a tutor was to find a place to tutor that fit my college schedule and transportation needs. I have been able to do this, but it means that I do all my tutoring on 2 days, so I do not use a lot of time/money commuting. I will have to assess my schedule for next semester to see if I have to change it for classes.
    My main challenge in helping children is that I am limited by the time and instructions I am given by the teachers. For the most part, teachers know what their children are struggling with and assign the tasks accordingly. Sometimes the tasks are either not helping or a student might have other issues that need to be addressed before or simultaneous to what was assigned. In these cases, I have to show confidence in my own observations and trust in the teacher's ability to listen to me, so I can talk to them about what I see. The main thought I apply when bringing my concern to a teacher is that "I am the visitor and they have deal with the results of what I do". This means that:
    1. I don't waste their time-short and to the point conversations.
    2. I speak respectfully and do not argue- defer to their assessment of the situation.
    3. I follow their instructions on how to work with a student- asking questions to clarify what to do and the purpose if necessary.
    As I have done this, it has not only increased the accuracy of the tutoring I give, but has improved my relationship with the teachers and satisfaction in what I am doing. So don't be afraid to ask questions and to respectfully question!

    CLS

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    1. Getting transportation and schedule that works with my school was also one of my challenges. I have classes both at south and redwood campuses with an odd schedule. However Lynne has addressed my concern and gave me an advice to try to work in two different places. Thus, I started working at both YMCA and Whittier depending on where I have class and it worked for me. Lydia

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    2. I also had transportation issue last year. I'm so glad Lynne gave us the opportunity to volunteer at the YMCA this year, this opened up the perfect location for me. You don't even have to volunteer at the main location, the Community Family Center (CFC). They have many satellite locations at the schools that have after school tutoring that could use our help.
      I really enjoy how much tutoring has polished my workplace relationship skills. I'm always trying to improve my communication, and tutoring has helped me from creating meaningful relationships with the people I work with to working with large groups of children. I never thought I would be more nervous to teach a group of 15 elementary children than 30 college students, but I was. I also find I'm even better at being effective at managing my time. It seems like to me like you're doing the same by arranging your schedule to get all of your hours in two days.
      I like your advise about asking questions. If you can't figure it out yourself, there are plenty of people that don't mind helping you find an answer. And by doing so, it shows that you actually care about what you're doing enough to ask.
      Cheers,
      Jeslicania

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  6. What are the challenges to being an America Reads tutor? I haven't face any challenges other than learning how to become a little bit more patient because I have never done any type of tutoring with younger children. I also have seen that at times parents don't know what to do to help their kids out.
    What are you doing to overcome these challenges? Well I have been getting in the habit of learning to become patient by actually become a peer tutor with one of college programs called Una Mano Amiga and I have learned a lot by becoming more involved and I believe that giving some type of workshop for parents its a great way to teach them on how they can help their kids get into a reading habit.
    Do you have any advice for others for how to make this easier? Just by simple doing you job as a tutor can make things much easier and when in doubt don't be afraid to ask questions to get clarification and just have fun while your at it.

    Hector.A

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    1. I completely understand patience. Sometime the kids can really challenge your patience but in the end it helps you have stronger patience because you were able to overcome.
      H.P.

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    2. This certainly does take some getting used to. Don't give up and remind yourself not to take things too seriously.

      AS

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    3. Something that might help you with your patients is to take into your perspective the fact that you don't know the parent's situation. There are so many factors that could inhibit a parent's ability to help their children, it's ridiculous. I would say most parents honestly want to see their children succeed, but just don't have the resource or ability to do so. That's where we come in to play.
      It's awesome you're developing patients; I found through my tutoring my patients levels last year shot up like crazy! I noticed this year it's much easier for me to have patients because I enjoy where I'm working. The YMCA is very pleasant to work at. I work at the CFC with Jamie, Corry and other amazing individuals. Too many of their employees will be quitting soon, and they are very appreciative of their volunteers help.
      I also noticed my Psychology class is helping me with my patient level with my students because it's breaking down child development and their unique stages of their life and how they perceive the world. I especially enjoyed Jean Piaget's four stage developmental theory because it gave me so much insight on what every single one of my age groups is going through developmentally.
      I find this year it's much easier for me to enjoy tutoring. The people you work with make a huge difference, and I feel like I'm valued at the YMCA.
      Patients is definitely a virtue. ;)
      Jeslicania

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    4. Patience definitely is something that I think each of us have had to practice, especially when we have never done this before, or if we find that we have kids that can be a little more challenging. But no matter what these kids need our help and it does take some getting used to when tutoring each kid individually (and a lot of times not even the same lessons of learning).

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  7. I find that one of the biggest challenges of being a tutor is having the kids participate and have a positive attitude about reading. When you struggle with something it can be hard to want to do it, especially in front of somebody. I've overcome this by helping them realize that I am only there to help them and I want them to succeed.I also have a lot of behavioral problems which I have learned to deal with separately within each grade using things like incentives and positive reinforcement. Another challenge is that some kids, no matter the amount of repetition just aren't grasping the concepts. This leads me to try various different methods, some very creative. Each child is different, and when they finally break through it's one of the best feelings in the world. Even though you might not see a visible difference in their ability, I do believe we are giving them a positive influence and are helping them in ways we might not know. I think my advice is to make things fun for the kids, and not make reading a serious task, but one that they will associate with positive things. B.F.

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    1. I have had this issue with a student too. I like your approach on how you handle the situation. I may have to try that approach the next time the issues arises.
      H.P.

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    2. It's true. Sometimes it feels like I am putting in 110% of the effort and getting nothing in return. But I have to remind myself that sometimes the kid is just having a bad day or isn't into it. There's always tomorrow. :)

      AS

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    3. We as adults desire to have things positive and have the approval of others. It is no different for these students we are working with. When we use words of encouragement and approval in our speech and attitude, I believe that we will reap great rewards in our efforts. It probably won’t be immediately but hopefully somewhere down the line in each childs life they will develop the desire to read, and may reflect back on something that their tutor taught them. We never know the difference we may be making in a childs life!

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  8. I am currently teaching kindergarten students at Whittier. I love what I do and the kids I teach. I am easily inspired and love to find ways to improve learning for my students using a variety of strategies and ideas. However there are some difficulties I had when I first start tutoring. Sometimes there might be kids that do not respect their teacher and also there are kids that don’t have interest in learning. This would make me question about my teaching style being effective. Therefore I try to analyze the nature of students, their learning capability and then teach them in their own ways so that the students feel relaxed and enjoy studying. I also motivate them by telling them how smart they are and as a result I see remarkable changes in the kids and I become their favorite tutor.
    To be a tutor is a gift and tutoring is one of the best services that we can give for the community. In all classes, we will see students who are at different ability levels, learn in different ways, and understand concepts at different times. Thus, tutors should be motivators and have to celebrate the smallest of the kids’ accomplishments. Lydia

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    1. I would think that parental encouragement of reading at home results in better reading skills and outcomes. Do you agree? As a teacher, do you see many parents involved in teaching their children to read outside of the classroom, or not so much? Thanks for humoring my curiosity.

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  9. My biggest challenge so far has come from a particular student. Apparently he wasn't in school until recently and as a result, has virtually no reading skill. He can barely pronounce most words, let alone string a sentence together.
    These challenges are not necessarily within my ability to overcome, but I can remind myself to be patient and to appreciate any amount of progress, no matter how small.
    My advice to other tutors would be to not beat yourself up when a student is struggling. Acknowledge that you are making an effort to improve these kids' lives and take pride in the fact that you are doing something to make a difference. :)

    -AS

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    1. Before you can help the student you must know the student. Also the student must learn that they can trust you. I feel that almost every situation has a solution if we are patient and determined enough to solve it. When a child feels approval they will do just about anything to continue to get that approval. Everybody has a different learning style, I feel that it is my job to offer as many different styles of learning to a student as they need in order to grasp the concepts.

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  10. My biggest challenge has been coordinating my home life so that it doesn't interfere with tutoring. I definitely have made some learning mistakes at this and am going to make sure that I find every possible solution to a problem that makes it difficult to attend a day of tutoring. It's too important to miss and I've come to understand that quite a bit the past week. Life is going to throw curve balls in many situations. So figuring out how to handle them is not only going to help me with tutoring but is also going to help me in life with it's challenges. Brian H.

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  11. At the beginning of the week I had 4 students I am working with. On Thursday I was assigned to work with 4 new students, bringing my total number of students to 8. I am feeling a little overwhelmed looking for ways to help each of these students, as each of them are at different levels in their reading/comprehension skills. Overcoming this challenge will just take time. I need to get to know each student better, do some things to figure out what skills they have and which skills need to be addressed. Most of the time I don’t really have a plan as I work with a student, I kind of just play it by ear from one session to the next. The answers on how to help a student just seem to pop into my head at the time that I need them.

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    1. I agree that knowing the strength and weakness of students is the big factor to address the help they need. sometimes not having enough time with each kid might make it difficult for this, however we as a tutor can overcome this challenge by putting more effort into it and teaching the kids the material that is appropriate for their level. thanks. Lydia

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  12. One of my challenges as an America Reads tutor last month came as a surprise. Of all things, I didn't expect to get pink eye! It wasn't too bad though, because I went to SLCC's Health and Wellness Center. It was really nice going there, as I got an appointment the same day and the first visit is free! After your first visit, it's only $10 per visit. The Physician there prescribed me some eye drops and also gave me some antibiotics for the bronchitis I had.
    The second challenge I've had is the available books that I can use to work with the kids. I volunteer at the YMCA, and at first they had a very scarce supply of books to work with. You don't really realize the variety of books you need to work with kids on all levels, but it's crucial if you're going to help them improve on their reading skills. They did eventually get a donation of books, and that helped immensely.
    My last challenge I dealt with was also shared by the other employees at the Y. There were three brothers that attended the Y's after school program every day. The two older boys were in grades 3 and 5, and one was reading on a Kindergarten level, the other a preschool level. When the mother puled these two older boys out of the program, everyone was devastated, especially their younger brother. These boys were the sweetest, and had a way of brightening up your day. Knowing they needed help breaks my heart. They're very intelligent, but they just don't have the resources to learn how to read. They were so excited to read with me, and now they can't. Their parents also need help, as English is their second language. I know how important being able to read is to a child, and the more behind they become, the more difficult it will be for them to be successful in school. The YMCA offers an after school tutoring program that is completely free, and I really hope their mother is taking advantage of that program. My heart goes out to these boys, and I want so much to see them succeed.
    My advice to my fellow AR tutors is: to keep your head up. Keep your eye out for resources you have available to you. Don't be afraid to ask for help. This takes practice, but with enough self talk and bravery, you can do it. Also know that you can't fix everyone and everything yourself. Just know you ARE making a difference, and that's what matters. Focus on that, and work from there. You'll find an answer to your challenges, and through the process of solving them, you will be a stronger, wiser, and better person. And remember, you rock!!!
    Jeslicania

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    1. Pink eye! Scary! I am pregnant (therefore my immune system isn't as good as normal) and am SO afraid of getting sick! I felt bad because I had to ask not to work with one student who was throwing up but still at school.
      I use a lot of hand sanitizer and wash my hands in between each class I tutor at... I haven't gotten sick yet, and I hope I don't! Good luck with everything else!
      And I love what you said: "You can't fix everyone and everything yourself. Just know you ARE making a difference, and that's what matters." That is very encouraging, thank you!
      AMDLP

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  13. I work with anywhere form 15-20 kids every time I tutor typically in groups of two to six. This is challenging at times because even though they’re grouped by skill level there’s different levels within the groups so it can be difficult to do certain activities. My solution so far to this has been to give them a little extra one-on-one time. Another challenge is some of the kids aren’t very interested in learning. One thing that is very helpful with this is having one of their friends in the class do an activity with them to help the child become more interested. Coming up with ways to make learning more enjoyable is another way to help a disinterested child. I think the best way I’ve found to overcome this challenge has been to tell them that I go to school every day and learn new things just like they do.

    My advice would be to make sure there’s good communication with the teachers and/or coordinator at the place you tutor and work with them as a team. It’s very important to be on the same page with everyone. Also, talk with the other tutors. Some have been tutoring for a while and have good insight.

    -ML

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    1. I love your last paragraph. That actually is very helpful. I tend to be a little insecure as how to handle some of the students that aren't as interested/hard to keep on task (especially in groups). I'm going to try your tactic with having one of their friends help, as well as communicating better with the teacher-- they just seem so overwhelmed (at least the one that I have) and I feel bad giving him more to think about during class. Thanks for the great advice!
      AMDLP

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  14. Some of the challenges that I got as an America Read tutor is keeping the children focus on the pages, I have a student that is excited to come read with me, but I have to start him at the very beginning with sounding out the letters in the words and combining them together, and it would get to difficult for him and he just wants to give up, so it takes a lot of patient working with him. Some things that I notice as a tutor is when students come across a words that are vowels and they use the short sound instead of the long vowel sounds and in this case I tell them to look at the end of the words and if there's a E at the end then the vowel is a long sound and it helps to remind them at the beginning of their reading. It help if you are motivated and you get the students motivated about reading too, and talking with other tutor and seeing what they do can help you when you tutor your students, because you can really learn a lot from them and they can learn something from you too.
    -MC

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    1. It can be hard when they are distracted! Especially the younger ones! I think you gave great advice-- keeping them motivated and upbeat is crucial to their learning experience.
      Learning how to explain the vowels has been a little bit of a challenge for me, as well. Good luck and you're doing great!
      AMDLP

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  15. I think one of my biggest challenges is working with the younger students. The teacher gives me about 3-5 at a time to work with at some points and it can be overwhelming (I'm sure the teacher feels this way and is thankful for the help in his/her classroom!) and hard to handle. It's hard to divide your attention between 3-5 1st graders who are constantly trying to move around and get distracted.
    I am overcoming this by practice. I think I have the patience to handle this, but am insecure as to how to go about it, but I am learning. This is a new experience and I am just happy I get to help in any way I can!
    The best advice I can give to others who are experiencing this, is just to relax and take one moment at a time (literally!). It can be stressful dealing with so many kids, but it is also rewarding once you walk out of the classroom and know that you did your best, and though you have much more to learn, that you are an awesome tutor for just being there and encouraging them.
    AMDLP

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  16. Some times the kids are difficult and you do not know how to work with them. I am a non-traditional student returning to college and going to college and doing all the work is hard in itself. Then I need to fit in going to the school and tutoring. What I like about Nibley is I am in the tutoring room with other tutors and can ask them what they would do and we all help each other. With some students I ask their teacher to give me suggestions on how to relate to the child. I talk it over with Sherrie the coordinator Every body should ask the tutors that have done this for more time, get to know them. they have good ideas and you find out that they had the same problems also..
    FH

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    1. I agree. Asking the teachers who has had more association with the kids than the tutors is a good way to get to know the kids better.

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    2. I agree. I like how much support we have from other tutors, Sherrie, and Lynne. We can always ask for someone's perspective on how to handle a certain situation. I find that when I ask for assistance, it not only helps me, but the children that I'm tutoring.

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  17. Some of the most common challenges faced as a tutor are scheduling and travel. I travel 25 minutes one way to get to the school that I tutor at. The way that I overcome that travel is by staying at my school all day for three days a week to shorten the trips that I have to drive. As for scheduling, I take as many of my classes online as available, so I have more flexibility in my schedule. The other challenge that I face is child care expense for my youngest. Since work study doesn’t count as a JOB with the state, I don’t get childcare assistance, so half my work study income goes to paying for daycare. I love being an America Reads tutor so this is an expense that is worth the results and only having my son go three days a week is cheaper that 5, so again it helps to just to tutor three full days instead of 5. If you have kids and you tutor, try and find a friend or family member to watch your kids for less to help avoid this expense. Unfortunately, I don’t have that option, but it would help if I did.

    KL

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    1. I am new to the program but am also bummed that we do not get childcare assistance. The College does have a program though if you didn't know. The hours are Great though for my kids, and I can do all my homework at night.

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    2. That's wonderful that you take the time to tutor children who need it at NP. I too deal with a long commute. I live way out in Utah County and I'm currently dealing with construction at the point of the mountain. The construction sometimes adds 15 mins to my commute. Hopefully, I'll be living in or near Salt Lake so I don;t have to deal with this commute any longer! Keep up the hard work. I can't imagine how difficult it would be to have kids, tutor, school, work, etc. Take-care - Austin

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  18. One of the challenges for me has been balancing school, parenting, and tutoring all into one week. I always make sure I am at Nibley Park when I am scheduled to be so that I can work with my kids, because that is one of the things I look forward too every day. Another challenge is to remind myself that the kids that I tutor with may or may not have help at home with their reading, and one keeps forgetting to bring back a book that he checked out from the tutor center, and that challenge has been trying to get the book back...without making the kid feel bad.
    Advice that I would give is to keep patient, even though there are weeks where it seems like there is no time in the schedule to breath, it will all work out. As long as patience and commitment is kept, especially with tutoring, it will be fine. These kids that we work with need our help, and they appreciate the one on one time that they get with us. We are their tutors and their friends.

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    1. I also have to remind myself that these kids may not be getting any help from home either. I have a student who I have to constantly write my initials on their readings logs. It gets kind of stressful having to always remind them or ask them why they haven't but I get it. It's also nice that we get to sit and listen to them read. We are sort of like their parents. I wish some of these parents could listen to their children read, they're so incredible. But I get why some can't and don't. I agree with keeping patients and commitment because that's truly all you need! Kids are awesome! :)

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  19. The challenges of being an America Read tutor are that you don’t fully know the struggles that some of these children are going through. Struggles like home issues, or getting attention from home. You can tell which children don’t get as much attention as they would like. These children are usually the ones who have a hard time listening to you or troubles with confidence. I am also part of Student Government and am taking afternoon classes, so sometimes with events occurring in my school I have a little trouble with having to leave a little early. I am overcoming these issues by first trying to stay as long as possible with my students and also understanding those students who have a hard time with paying attention to me. I let them first tell me how they are feeling and ask them why they’re so listening to me. This usually helps them with expressing their feelings and me trying to find a solution. I give them the motivation they need to hear and they usually get right into reading. It’s actually really rewarding! What I recommend is like I mentioned, listening to their stories and trying to find a solution also kind of not trick them, but distract them. I usually get my students to listen to me if I mention something about playing a game at the end of reading or giving them treats! Patients is key my friends! ☺

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  20. Some of the challenges that I’ve had as an American Reads tutor is dealing with some kids at YMCA that has troubles listening to the staff/volunteers. I observe the staff members’ ways in how they deal with this problem, and looking for ways to solve this issue like giving the students consequences so they learn that their behavior needs to be changed. I feel like being able to be patient with the kids, and being able to connect with them in a way definitely is a key. Another challenge I've encountered is understanding how to best help each kid. Knowing not only their struggles with reading, but their struggles to read at home would definitely help. I encourage the students when they don't bring back their book or they don't read at home, it's all I can do is to encourage them and support them.
    -SY

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  21. At times, there are many challenges with working with students. I tutor second graders who -may at times- begin to day-dreaming and fall off task. I noticed this and though what I can I do to combat this issue. One day while a student was reading, I abruptly stopped him as he finished a page and said, "what was that page about?" He replied,"that's not fair." I then said, "be ready for the next time I ask"(in a blissful manner). Incidentally, the child I was tutoring became over zealous with telling me the details of what he had read. I think it's better for students to not only read, but to understand and lean to love reading.

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